Tuesday, December 21, 2010

It's a Wonderful Life

As a sort of Chanukah/Christmas/Kwanza/Festivus/Winter Solstice present to my readers, here are some photos from a few recent flights that I hope you'll enjoy.









































8 comments:

Steve said...

Beautiful photos, John!

flywilks said...

Great photos! Quick question...when transitioning from the WVI DME arc (flown using GPS guidance) to the final approach course on the VOR/DME-A when do you have students transition the CDI source to VOR from GPS? Or do you have them use GPS in the CDI and put the VOR in BRG1 as a "backup?" Is this second way legal,smart,approved? I'm a bit rusty on the G1000 stuff. Love seeing pics of my old stomping grounds. Thanks

John Ewing said...

Glad you like the photos.

Regarding flying the WVI VOR/DME A approach with the G1000, the procedure I teach is:

1) Load the approach with the appropriate IAF once ATC tells you to expect the approach.

2) If there are VORs that you can tune for backup, by all means do so and activate the appropriate bearing pointers.

3) Fly the approach using GPS as your primary reference until you're 3 miles or so from the FAF. If you're being vectored for a non-RNAV approach, be sure you've activated the appropriate leg of the approach to which ATC is vectoring you.

4) 3 miles from the FAF verify the RNAV approach sensitivity that is armed and brief the appropriate minima. For non-RNAV approaches, select the appropriate nav source for the HSI (if you haven't done so already), verify the frequency and Morse code ID, and (if necessary) set the correct approach course.

If you fly a VOR approach with the HSI set to GPS as the nav source, the G1000 will display one of two advisory messages:

SLCT FREQ – Select appropriate frequency for approach.

SLCT NAV – Select NAV on CDI for approach.

Of course one could continue to fly with the GPS as the HSI nav source, back it up with the bearing pointer set to the VOR, and claim that you're using the VOR bearing pointer as your primary means of navigation; the HSI set to GPS is just for situational awareness. Since the G1000 will display an alert telling to change nav sources and the G1000 documentation says the same thing, a reasonable pilot should conclude that this is not the way Garmin intended their equipment to be used. I wouldn't recommend doing this on a check ride.

gmedina said...

Hey, John, nice photos! Did you use your iPhone 4 Camera to take these?

John Ewing said...

Yes these were all iPhone4 photos, though I'm lusting after a Richo digital ...

flywilks said...

Thanks John, about the same procedure as I teach. Happy holiday flying.

toddgrx said...

love the KLLR shots... went there day after Thanksgiving for the first time. and learned about SuperAWOS

toddgrx said...

love the KLLR photos. went there first time ever on day after Thanksgiving... learned about SuperAWOS!!!