Monday, May 22, 2006

Unlucky day for the C210

I occasionally visit the FAA web site and review the preliminary accident and incident information, which can be instructive, interesting, and sometimes fascinating.

The data for May 19th included over 22 accidents and incidents, but seven of them involved Cessna C210 aircraft. While none of the C210 accidents involved fatalities, four of the seven accidents involved gear-up or partial gear-up landings.

ALBUQUERQUE, NM C210 - AIRCRAFT LANDED RUNWAY 3 AND EXITED AT TAXIWAY F3. AIRCRAFT WAS CLEAR OF RUNWAY BUT HAD NOT CONTACTED GROUND CONTROL FOR TAXI INSTRUCTIONS WHEN IT FLIPPED OVER.

BATTLE GROUND, WA C210 - AIRCRAFT LANDED LONG AND FAST AT THE BUZZARDS FLAT ARPT, 2009PDT. THE PILOT ATTEMPTED A GO-AROUND. THE AIRCRAFT STRUCK SEVERAL TREES, CRASHED AND CAUGHT FIRE.

REDDING, CA C210 - TO BENTON FIELD, REDDING, CA, LOST ENGINE POWER AND LANDED INTO KESWICK RESERVOIR ON THE SACRAMENTO RIVER. THE AIRCRAFT SUNK. THE SOLE OCCUPANT SWAM TO SHORE. NO INJURIES.

LAS VEGAS, NV C210 - ACFT LANDED NORTH LAS VEGAS AIRPORT WITH THE NOSE LANDING GEAR EXTENDED BUT THE MAIN LANDING GEAR RETRACTED.

CHICO, CA C210 - ACFT DEPARTED RWY 13L AND CLIMBED TO ABOUT 200-300 FT AND REPORTED ENGINE MISFIRE. ACFT WAS CLEARED TO LAND ANY RWY. ACFT LANDED GEAR UP.

RIO VISTA, CA C210 - ACFT LANDED GEAR UP.

ANDERSON, SC C210 - ACFT LANDED GEAR UP.

What are the odds?

6 comments:

Steve said...

...any landing you can walk away from.

Anonymous said...

I also check the FAA site too (on regular basis). Each Monday I see deadly accidents that happen in weekend. So my guess is that is more likely to happen to somebody to flies once in a while (let's say because doesn't have money to fly more often) that somebody who flies for a living. Somehow expected, high fatality rate in experimental category.

Anonymous said...

John: Here's a beginner's question. If you are a freelance CFII -- like it seems that you are -- how does it work as a freelancer? What I mean is, if you have a student, does your student rent a plane from a local FBO and then tell the FBO, "I've hired my own instructor; we'll be back in an hour"...? Or do all of your students own their own airplanes? Or...something else? Just curious.

Anonymous said...

John-- at the beginning of this post you refer us to the FAA accident site. What's the difference between that and the NTSB site here: http://www.ntsb.gov/
ntsb/month.asp

I thought the NTSB investigates accidents.

John said...

Some answers to anonymous questions:

Freelance instructing can be complicated. I'm a part-time instructor with some different FBOs and I fly with several people who own their own aircraft. I'm lucky because my schedule filled up immediately after I left my 135 job. Not all instructors are as lucky ...

Regarding the accident/incident data, the NTSB does indeed investigate these. For some reason, the preliminary data appears on the FAA site everyday. The NTSB preliminary and final reports can take much longer to appear on their website, but are much more detailed.

Yellowbird said...

ALBUQUERQUE, NM C210 - AIRCRAFT LANDED RUNWAY 3 AND EXITED AT TAXIWAY F3. AIRCRAFT WAS CLEAR OF RUNWAY BUT HAD NOT CONTACTED GROUND CONTROL FOR TAXI INSTRUCTIONS WHEN IT FLIPPED OVER.

That'll teach him not to contact ground...